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Silverback


Silverback
相片資料
著作權:Tom Conzemius (pirate) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 797 W: 152 N: 1186] (7474)
類別:Animals
媒體:彩色
拍攝日期:2013-10-30
分類:Mammals
相機:Canon 7D, Canon EF 70-300mm f/4-5.6 IS USM
Exposure:f/4.5, 1/20 seconds
More Photo Info:[view]
Photo Version:Original Version
提交日期:2013-12-04 7:16
觀看:2419
數數:12
[Note Guidelines] 攝影師備註
Here we are Peter, for your 7th anniversary
my zoom was at the focal length of 70 mm

from Wikipedia

The mountain gorilla is highly social, and lives in relatively stable, cohesive groups held together by long-term bonds between adult males and females. Relationships among females are relatively weak.[17] These groups are nonterritorial; the silverback generally defends his group rather than his territory. In the Virunga mountain gorillas, the average length of tenure for a dominant silverback is 4.7 years.[18]


Silverback mountain gorilla with female
61% of groups are composed of one adult male and a number of females and 36% contain more than one adult male. The remaining gorillas are either lone males or exclusively male groups, usually made up of one mature male and a few younger males. Group sizes vary from five to thirty, with an average of ten individuals. A typical group contains: one dominant silverback, who is the group's undisputed leader; another subordinate silverback (usually a younger brother, half-brother, or even an adult son of the dominant silverback); one or two blackbacks, who act as sentries; three to four sexually mature females, who are ordinarily bonded to the dominant silverback for life; and from three to six juveniles and infants.
Most males, and about 60% of females, leave their natal group. Males leave when they are about 11 years old, and often the separation process is slow: they spend more and more time on the edge of the group until they leave altogether. They may travel alone or with an all-male group for 25 years before they can attract females to join them and form a new group. Females typically emigrate when they are about 8 years old, either transferring directly to an established group or beginning a new one with a lone male. Females often transfer to a new group several times before they settle down with a certain silverback male.
The dominant silverback generally determines the movements of the group, leading it to appropriate feeding sites throughout the year. He also mediates conflicts within the group and protects it from external threats. When the group is attacked by humans, leopards, or other gorillas, the silverback will protect them even at the cost of his own life. He is the center of attention during rest sessions, and young animals frequently stay close to him and include him in their games. If a mother dies or leaves the group, the silverback is usually the one who looks after her abandoned offspring, even allowing them to sleep in his nest. This is a form of alloparental care which is a common behavior and is seen in many other animal species such as the elephant and the wolf. Experienced silverbacks are capable of removing poachers' snares from the hands or feet of their group members.
When the dominant silverback dies or is killed by disease, accident, or poachers, the family group may be severely disrupted. Unless he leaves behind a male descendant capable of taking over his position, the group will either split up or be taken over in its entirety by an unrelated male. When a new silverback takes control of a family group, he may kill all of the infants of the dead silverback. This practice of infanticide is an effective reproductive strategy, in that the newly acquired females are then able to conceive the new male's offspring. Infanticide has not been observed in stable groups.

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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Tom
nice picture of a thinker, :)
tfs
samiran

  • Great 
  • PeterZ Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5099 W: 166 N: 13042] (48618)
  • [2013-12-04 8:04]

Hello Tom,
Great photo of this silverback. Probably the same as I've seen twelve years ago. Beautiful animal with his impressive pose and expression.
An excellent photo in marvellous quality.
Thanks my friend.
Regards,
Peter

  • Great 
  • anel Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Note Writer [C: 3049 W: 3 N: 8714] (40568)
  • [2013-12-04 12:06]

Bonsoir Tom,
What en encounter, a big Silverback, you must have been thrilled to see these Mountain gorillas. Lovely series of this interesting animals. I think I would be quite nervous to see them so close. I have seen a few months ago a documentary on Gorillas in Uganda, probably made in the same area where you have been.
Bone soir嶪!
Anne

Hello Mr.Tom,
Beautiful picture of this Silver back.He is looking grumpy or thinking about future.Good details and colour.
Thanks for sharing,
Regards and have a nice time,
Srikumar

Hello Tom,
Nice capture with fine details and very informative note you've presented.
Regards,
Joy

Hello Tom

Excellent photo of the mountain gorilla in its natural habitat
surrounded by the vegetation that are bringing a plus to the photo,
fine POV on its expression with appropriate vertical framing, TFS

Asbed

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