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Dwarf Mongoose


Dwarf Mongoose
相片資料
著作權:Peter van Zoest (PeterZ) Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5097 W: 166 N: 13041] (48614)
類別:Animals
媒體:彩色
拍攝日期:2017-11-03
分類:Mammals
相機:Nikon D90, Tamron SP 150-600mm f/5-6.3 Di VC USD, Digital RAW
Exposure:f/6.3, 1/250 seconds
Details:Tripod:Yes
More Photo Info:[view]
Photo Version:Original Version
提交日期:2017-12-26 5:10
觀看:269
數數:12
[Note Guidelines] 攝影師備註
The Common Dwarf Mongoose (Helogale parvula), sometimes just called the Dwarf Mongoose, is a small African carnivore belonging to the mongoose family (Herpestidae).

Physical characteristics
The common dwarf mongoose is a typical mongoose: it has a large pointed head, small ears, a long tail, short limbs and long claws. The species can be distinguished from other mongooses by its size. It is much smaller than most other species (18 to 28 cm, 210 to 350 grams); in fact, it is Africa's smallest carnivore. The soft fur is very variable in color, ranging from yellowish red to very dark brown.

Distribution and habitat
The common dwarf mongoose is primarily found in dry grassland, open forests, and bush land, up to 2,000 m in altitude. It is especially common in areas with many termite mounds, their favorite sleeping place. The species avoids dense forests and deserts. The common dwarf mongoose can also be found in the surroundings of settlements, and can become quite tame.
The species ranges from East to southern Central Africa, from Eritrea and Ethiopia to the provinces of Limpopo and Mpumalanga in the Republic of South Africa.

Behaviour
The common dwarf mongoose is a diurnal animal. It is a highly social species that lives in extended family groups of two to thirty animals. There is a strict hierarchy among same-sexed animals within a group, headed by the dominant pair (normally the oldest group members). All group members cooperate in helping to rear the pups and in guarding the group from predators.
Young mongooses attain sexual maturity by one year of age but delay dispersal, with males usually emigrating (in the company of their brothers) at 23 years old. Dispersing males may join other established groups, either as subordinates or by ousting the resident males, or they may found new groups with unrelated dispersing females. In contrast, females normally remain in their home group for life, queuing for the dominant position. They will, however, emigrate to found a new group if they lose their place in the hierarchy to a younger sister.
Dwarf mongooses are territorial, and each group uses an area of approximately 30-60 hectares (depending on the type of habitat). They sleep at night in disused termite mounds, although they occasionally use piles of stones, hollow trees, etc. The mongooses mark their territory with anal gland and cheek gland secretions and latrines. Territories often overlap slightly, which can lead to confrontations between different groups, with the larger group tending to win.
Dwarf mongooses tend to breed during the wet season, between October and April, raising up to three litters. Usually only the group's dominant female becomes pregnant, and she is responsible for 80% of the pups reared by the group. If conditions are good, subordinate females may also become pregnant, but their pups rarely survive. After the gestation period of 53 days, 4-6 young are born. They remain below ground within a termite mound for the first 23 weeks. Normally one or more members of the group stay behind to babysit while the group goes foraging. Subordinate females often produce milk to feed the dominant female's pups. At 4 weeks of age the pups begin accompanying the group. All group members help to provide them with prey items until they are around 10 weeks old.
A mutualistic relationship has evolved between dwarf mongooses and hornbills, in which hornbills seek out the mongooses in order for the two species to forage together, and to warn each other of nearby raptors and other predators.

Diet
The diet of the common dwarf mongoose consists of insects (mainly beetle larvae, termites, grasshoppers and crickets), spiders, scorpions, small lizards, snakes, small birds, and rodents, and is supplemented very occasionally with berries.

Source: Wikipedia


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Critiques [Translate]

Hi Peter, my neighbour in the gallery today,
Great photo of the dwarf mongoose with effective eye contact. The monochrome tones are fine, too, as well as sharpness and composition. Congratulations!
Kind regards from Ireland, L獺szl籀

  • Great 
  • lousat Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 5887 W: 89 N: 14990] (62891)
  • [2017-12-27 1:55]

Hi Peter,magnificent capture of this mongoose,the perfect pose and a great quality of details too,perfect shot of this specie not often seen on TN, i like a lot its sad face expression...ehehe....have a nice day and thanks,Luciano

mooie foto peter
leuke compositie op de boomstronk en mooie achtergrond maakt hem super
gezond en voorspoedig 2018
gr lou

  • Great 
  • tuslaw Gold Star Critiquer/Gold Star Workshop Editor/Gold Note Writer [C: 2718 W: 279 N: 4899] (19808)
  • [2017-12-27 7:07]

Hello Peter,
A critter not often seen here on TN, you have done a fine job of photographing it for us. Very sharp focus and nice eye contact. I was fortunate to be able to photograph some while in Tanzania earlier in the year.
Ron

One truly wonderful and aesthetically pleasant capture Peter ...love it ! I guess you've been here in SA for a while !
Regards
George Veltchev

nice portrait in a natural setting, greetings Ori

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